Previous Exhibiting Artists

Numen Gallery, Powell Street Festival Society & explorASIAN present
Naoko Takenouchi, Miyuki Shinkai & HiDe Ebina
MERGE/
Frozen-Melt
May 3 - June 1,
2008

MERGE is an exhibition of contemporary glass and ceramic art by Naoko Takenouchi, Miyuki Shinkai, and HiDe Ebina of the Frozen-Melt Collective. Through their artwork, the artists re-imagine the issues of identity that arise from the merging of cultures: East and West, old and new, philosophy and technology.

Naoko Takenouchi completed a four-year degree course in design and glassblowing at Tama Art University in Tokyo and also attended New York Experimental Glass Workshop. She then continued her work at the Swedish Center Foundation and at New-Small & Sterling Studio in Vancouver, B.C. She was a scholarship student at Pilchuck Glass School in 1993 and 1998. Her work was included in New Glass Review 16 and the 1995 International Exhibition of Glass in Kanazawa. She has received many awards in Canada and was commissioned to create the Governor General’s Performing Art’s Awards from 2003 to 2006.

View Takenouchi's Exhibited Works

Miyuki Shinkai was born and raised in Japan. Before settling down with her family in Gibsons B.C., she travelled extensively and in 1993 earned her master's degree in social administration and glass blowing in the United States. She attended Pilchuck Glass School and worked for Dale Chihuly in Seattle. "I have been experimenting in many ways to share both the material beauty and the peaceful quality of the glass medium by creating works of art ranging from those on an intimate scale to large dynamic works for exhibitions at various art galleries and museums throughout North America."

HiDe Ebina has worked with clay for eighteen years and as a professional studio potter in Vancouver B.C. since 1995. Although he studied under various masters in Japan the art of functional pottery, he is largely self-taught. He constantly challenges his creativity through his experimentations with form and material, combining the traditional elements of Japanese ceramics with contemporary sensibilities.